Used Oil Filters – The Other Shoe Drops (CA ONLY), August 2016

BACKGROUND:  Used oil filters may exhibit hazardous characteristics and are hence, classified as hazardous waste in California. To encourage recycling of used oil filters, California DTSC adopted reduced handling requirements for drained used oil filters that are sent for recycling as scrap metal. We wrote about that in July 2016 stating that you should drain the filter properly.  Now the DTSC (Cal/EPA) has started to classify all used oil filters, with a flapper valve that prevents oil from being drained out, as hazardous waste. 

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Heat Illness Prevention Program Training, May 2016

BackgroundCal/OSHA heat illness prevention regulation (T8CCR3395) became effective on May 1, 2015.  This standard applies to outdoor areas of employment.  When porters are parking cars and salespersons are showing automobiles on display to customers or taking them on test drives, they are considered to be working outdoors.  Fed-OSHA also requires that employees be trained in heat illness prevention under a general injury prevention standard.  Cal/OSHA enforcement details are at http://www.dir.ca.gov/dosh/heatillnessqa.html.

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Death of a Salesman – And Means to Avoid It, March 2016

Accident 1:  On the afternoon of February 22, 2016, a test drive of a Corvette from a dealership in Ontario, CA became a tragedy.  Reportedly, the driver was driving at 70 MPH before the crash took place, which resulted in the salesperson losing his life.  LA Times reported that the customer was treated for injuries at a local hospital and arrested on suspicion of vehicular manslaughter and driving under the influence of drugs.

Solution 1:  While it may be difficult to recognize a customer being under the influence of drugs, salespersons should remain attentive to inebriated customers and decline any test drive in which drugs or alcohol may become a factor.  Also, the dealership must constantly reiterate: “All test drives must be safe and within posted speed limits.”

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Investigate Accidents, Log 300, Workers’ Compensation, etc., April 2002

Investigate Accidents:  Save Money & Fight Fraud

A prompt, accurate and thoughtful accident investigation can, simply stated, save money and fight fraud.  First, it is state law that mandates that an employer investigate each accident and take corrective measures to prevent repetition of accidents.  Secondly, a written investigation report can be reviewed by senior management or the safety committee to undertake steps that would prevent such accidents in the future.  Last and not the least, such reports can be useful ammo in fighting the 3F–Fictitious, Fraudulent or Frivolous claims.  In summary, as an employer, it is your duty to provide a safe workplace and also to ensure that any worker’s compensation claim is legitimate and preventable in the future.

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Fluorescent Lamps, Tire Fees, SCAQMD Requirements, etc., November 2000

Bright Idea?

You cannot dump your fluorescent lamps into the dumpster any more!  The US EPA has made changes to waste rules applying to spent mercury-containing light bulbs that requires recycling of these lamps and prohibit landfill disposal.

The rule has been adopted to reduce the disposal of mercury containing wastes into landfills.  Mercury is a toxic pollutant that accumulates in our body, especially for children who are at a high risk as they absorb more mercury as a percentage of their body weight.  Examples of wastes that are being regulated under this new rule are fluorescent, high-intensity discharge, neon, mercury vapor, high pressure sodium, metal halide, thermostat (with metallic mercury in an ampoule), batteries (non-automotive), and lamp ballasts.

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Hazmat Manifest, Forklift Training, Injuries and Fatalities Reports, etc., July 2000

Bye-Bye Manifest

California hazardous waste disposal documentation laws have been simplified.  Now disposal of waste antifreeze, oil/water separator sludge (500 gallon per 30-day period) and parts cleaning solvent (both petroleum-based and water-based) do not require the completion of a manifest.  The manifest is a six-page, multi-colored State of California document that needed to be completed for disposal of any hazardous waste unless exempted.

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