Injury Log Requirements & Accident Reporting to Fed-OSHA, September 2016

LOG 300, 300A & 301 REQUIRED FOR AUTO DEALERS

Background: Cal/OSHA now requires auto dealers and other employers to keep a record of occupational injuries and illnesses using OSHA Log 300. We note that Fed-OSHA had issued these requirements to auto dealers in 2015.

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Death of a Salesman – And Means to Avoid It, March 2016

Accident 1:  On the afternoon of February 22, 2016, a test drive of a Corvette from a dealership in Ontario, CA became a tragedy.  Reportedly, the driver was driving at 70 MPH before the crash took place, which resulted in the salesperson losing his life.  LA Times reported that the customer was treated for injuries at a local hospital and arrested on suspicion of vehicular manslaughter and driving under the influence of drugs.

Solution 1:  While it may be difficult to recognize a customer being under the influence of drugs, salespersons should remain attentive to inebriated customers and decline any test drive in which drugs or alcohol may become a factor.  Also, the dealership must constantly reiterate: “All test drives must be safe and within posted speed limits.”

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Accident Investigation: The Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How, May 2015

Accident investigation should be the cornerstone of any safety program.  Many safety programs concentrate on safety inspections and training, but omit accident investigation.  Investigating accidents is not only a good idea, but also a requirement.  Below, we provide some guidance and tools to complete an accident investigation.

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Accident Reporting to OSHA & Injury Log Requirements, October 2014

OSHA INJURY LOG REQUIREMENTS

LOG 300, 300A & 301 REQUIRED FOR AUTO DEALERS

Background:  Prior to January 1, 2002 Cal/OSHA required auto dealers and other employers to keep an injury log known as OSHA Log 200.  Starting January 1, 2002, Fed-OSHA enacted Log 300, replacing the Log 200, but kept auto dealers exempt.  Good news was that California joined the Feds on 1/1/2002 and kept auto dealers exempt from logging requirements, as stated here.

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Investigate Accidents, Log 300, Workers’ Compensation, etc., April 2002

Investigate Accidents:  Save Money & Fight Fraud

A prompt, accurate and thoughtful accident investigation can, simply stated, save money and fight fraud.  First, it is state law that mandates that an employer investigate each accident and take corrective measures to prevent repetition of accidents.  Secondly, a written investigation report can be reviewed by senior management or the safety committee to undertake steps that would prevent such accidents in the future.  Last and not the least, such reports can be useful ammo in fighting the 3F–Fictitious, Fraudulent or Frivolous claims.  In summary, as an employer, it is your duty to provide a safe workplace and also to ensure that any worker’s compensation claim is legitimate and preventable in the future.

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Civil & Criminal Penalties, First-Aid, Penalties, etc., November 1999

Civil & Criminal Penalties Increased for OSHA Violations

On October 5, 1999, Governor Davis signed into law a bill which increases the civil and criminal penalties for willful, serious and repeat violations of occupational safety and health (Cal-OSHA) standards.  The law goes into effect on January 1, 2000, which gives the district attorneys more flexibility to prosecute as either a misdemeanor or a felony, willful violations of safety standards which result in a death or permanent/prolonged impairment.

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