Used Oil Filters – The Other Shoe Drops (CA ONLY), August 2016

BACKGROUND:  Used oil filters may exhibit hazardous characteristics and are hence, classified as hazardous waste in California. To encourage recycling of used oil filters, California DTSC adopted reduced handling requirements for drained used oil filters that are sent for recycling as scrap metal. We wrote about that in July 2016 stating that you should drain the filter properly.  Now the DTSC (Cal/EPA) has started to classify all used oil filters, with a flapper valve that prevents oil from being drained out, as hazardous waste. 

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Brouhaha Over Paper or Metal – Management of Used Oil & Fuel Filters (CA ONLY), July 2016

BACKGROUND:  Used Oil Filters may exhibit hazardous characteristics and hence are classified as hazardous waste in California. To encourage recycling of used oil filters, California DTSC adopted reduced handling requirements for drained used oil filters that are sent for recycling as scrap metal. Used oil filters must not be disposed in trash cans or at nonhazardous waste landfills.  Legislation was enacted in 2004 (AB 2254, Aghazarian) that allowed spent fuel filters from automobiles be added to spent oil filters for disposal.

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California Regulations on Air Conditioning Equipment & Service Requirements, July 2015

Background: California has regulations on virtually everything, including what to look for when you are fixing the AC in a car. The AC regulations have been around since 2003 with relative low compliance. Last year, California Bureau of Automotive Repair (BAR) issued six-figure fines and ordered temporary suspensions of BAR license for failure to comply with California regulations, indicating that this is serious business. The awareness in the California dealer community on this issue is lacking so we have taken this step to inform dealers of this regulation and possible compliance steps.

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New Federal Law on Personal Protective Equipment, January 2008

Many Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) health & safety standards require employers to provide their employees with protective equipment, including personal protective equipment (PPE), when such equipment is necessary to protect employees from job-related injuries, illnesses, and fatalities. These requirements address PPE of many kinds: hard hats, gloves, goggles, safety shoes, safety glasses, goggles, face shields, chemical protective equipment, and so forth. They state that the employer is to provide such PPE. However, these provisions do not specify that the employer is to provide such PPE at no cost to the employee.   Continue reading

Southern California Fires, October 2006

The fires raging through seven counties in Southern California have burnt through thousands of acres and have resulted in widespread loss to property.  The intense smoke and ash generated by the fires have resulted in health & safety issues that must be addressed by the employers.  A brief summary of the concerns and the employer response is as follows:

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